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3 documents found tagged thrips [X]
  • Title
    Checklist of terebrantian thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) recorded from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A consolidated systematic list of 333 species of terebrantian thrips, belonging to 118 genera (Insecta: Thysanoptera) recorded so far from India, is provided in this article. The list reveals that the family Thripidae has the lion’s share of 307 species, while Aeolothripidae, Melanthripidae, Merothripidae and Stenurothripidae contain very few species. Further, analysis of the present study shows that around 40% of the listed 333 terebrantian species appear to be endemic based on the comparison of Indian fauna with that of the published data of thrips of adjoining regions. Reports on the occurrence of exotic flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) and Neohydatothrips samayunkur (Kudo) are of concern to the country, as they are notorious for damage to the cultivated plants.
    Attribution
    R.R. Rachana & R. Varatharajan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 1 (2017); pp. 9748–9755http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2705.9.1.9748-9755
  • Title
    A new species of Tylothrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) with new records of four terebrantians and four tubuliferans from Manipur, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
     A survey carried out for thrips (Thysanoptera) at the Keibul Lamjao National Park, Manipur and at Manipur University campus, within  the Indo-Burma hotspot region of northeastern India revealed the occurrence of Anaphothrips incertus (Girault), Mycterothrips auratus Wang, Bamboosiella hartwigi (Pitkin), Euphysothrips minozzii Bagnall, Mycterothrips ricini (Shumsheer), Dolichothrips citripes (Bagnall), Xylaplothrips flavitibia Ananthakrishnan & Jagadish and X. inquilinus Priesner.  The occurrence of the first three species in India and the remaining five species in northeastern India is reported for the first time through the present study.  In addition, a new species, Tylothrips samirseni sp. nov. is described.
    Attribution
    Varatharajan R., Singh K. Nishikanta, Bala K. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(7) pp. 7157-7163; doi:10.11609/jott.1972.7157-7163
  • Title
    Pollination biology of Eriolaena hookeriana Wight and Arn. (Sterculiaceae), a rare tree species of Eastern Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Eriolaena hookeriana is a rare medium-sized deciduous tree species. The flowering is very brief and occurs during early wet season. The flowers attract certain bees such as Apis dorsata, Halictus sp., Anthophora sp., Xylocopa latipes, and also the wasp, Rhynchium sp. at the study sites. These foragers collect both pollen and nectar during which they contact the stamens and stigma and effect self- or cross-pollination. Nectar depletion by thrips during bud and flower phase and the production of few flowers daily at tree level drive the pollinator insects to visit conspecific plants to gather more forage and in this process they maximize cross-pollination. The hermaphroditic flowers with the stigmatose style beyond the height of stamens and the sticky pollen grains do not facilitate autogamy but promote out-crossing. The study showed that pollinator limitation is responsible for the low fruit set but it is, however, partly compensated by multi-seeded fruits. Bud and anther predation by beetles also affects reproductive success. Explosive fruit dehiscence and anemochory are special characteristics; these events occur during the dry season. The plant is used for various purposes locally and hence the surviving individuals are threatened. The study suggests that the rocky and nutrient-poor soils, the pollinator limitation, bud and anther predation, establishment problems and local uses collectively contribute to the rare occurrence of E. hookeriana in the Eastern Ghats.
    Attribution
    Raju A.J.S., Chandra P.H., Ramana K.V., Krishna J.R. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(6) pp. 5819-5829; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3840.5819-29