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1933 documents found
  • Title
    A first record of the Lined Wrasse Anampses lineatus Randall, 1972 (Perciformes: Labridae) in the Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Lined wrasse Anampses lineatus Randall was recorded off the coast of Tuticorin (Gulf of Mannar), Tamil Nadu, India for the first time. It is easily distinguished by the presence of pale longitudinal lines on the body following scale rows. Broad pale white and black color patch at the base of caudal fin is distinct. Morphological description of A. lineatus is provided based on the present material along with detailed distribution records; habitat and closely related species were also discussed.
    Attribution
    S. Prakash & T.T. Ajith Kumar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8923–8926 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1984.8.6.8923-8926
  • Title
    Rediscovery of Penicillium paradoxum (Ascomycete: Aspergillaceae)from Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Penicillium paradoxum has an enigmatic Aspergillus-like anamorphic state; earlier named as Aspergillus paradoxus with a teleomorph state Hemicarpenteles paradoxus. The present paper describes the rediscovery of this species from India after five decades and includes a phylogenetic study of this strain. This is the first record of this strain from peninsular India including the Western Ghats.
    Attribution
    Kunhiraman C. Rajeshkumar, Sayali D. Marathe, Sneha S. Lad, Deepak K. Maurya, Sanjay K. Singh & Santosh V. Swami, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8919–8922 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2569.8.6.8919-8922
  • Title
    A checklist of avifauna from Malgaon-Bagayat and Malvan towns of Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present work was carried out in Malgaon-Bagayat (16009’04.35”N & 73033’04.7”E) and Malvan Taluka (16005’00”N & 73030’00”E) of Sindhudurg District. The paper represents the first document on birds as there are no published records from Sindhudurg District. The study was conducted for a period of two years to explore the avifauna as no records have been published yet from this area. A total of 101 species of birds belonging to 17 orders and 45 families and were recorded in the study areas inhabiting different types of habitats. The Order Passeriformes contributed the maximum species (44.9%) followed by Pelecaniformes (9.2%), Charadriiformes (8.2%) and Accipitriformes (6.1%). The species such as the Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Common Hoopoe, and Pied Kingfisher were observed only once in the study area. The common occurrence of the Near Threatened Malabar Pied Hornbill in Bagayat signifies the ornithological importance of this site. Long-term studies on distribution and abundance are required to prepare a conservation plan for avifauna in Sindhudurg District. The data generated can be considered as baseline data for future conservation and management of existing species.
    Attribution
    Mayura Khot, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8909–8918 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1706.8.6.8909-8918
  • Title
    Perch height and the hunting success of the Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Franklin) (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae) targeting anuran prey
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Investigation into the predation of a pair of Indian Eagle Owls on anurans disclosed the fact that the greatest success (52.17%) was when the owls pounced from a height of less than 2m and the lowest (12.5%) was from a height of 5–6 m. No success was recorded when the owls pounced from over a height of 6m or when they tried wading in water to catch their prey. Overall, 146 pounces were observed and the strike success was 28.7%.
    Attribution
    Eric Ramanujam, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8905–8908 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2606.8.6.8905-8908
  • Title
    Egg parasitoids from the subfamily Scelioninae (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) in irrigated rice ecosystems across varied elevational ranges in southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Platygastridae (Hymenoptera) is the most abundant family of parasitic Hymenoptera in rice ecosystems in southern India. Members belonging to the subfamily Scelioninae were assessed in rice ecosystems along three elevation ranges, a highland (737m), midland (54m) and lowland (1.5m) in northcentral Kerala (southern India) during the pre-flowering to the milky-grain stage of paddy. Malaise traps were employed as the standard specimen collection methodology with collections made for four weeks, using two malaise traps per field, from August 2008 to January 2009, serviced once a week. The study recorded a total of 198 individuals belonging to 38 species in 21 genera. The species diversity, richness, evenness as well as beta diversity were computed for the three sites along with ANOVA and it was concluded that, contrary to other studies on different taxa, elevation did not have any major effect on the overall diversity patterns in Platygastridae even though there was a difference in species assemblages.
    Attribution
    M. Shweta & K. Rajmohana, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8898–8904 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2061.8.6.8898-8904
  • Title
    Description of a new species of Umairia Hayat (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) with additional distribution records of aphelinids from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new species, Umairia chidambaramensis Manickavasagam & Ayyamperumal, is described from Tamil Nadu, India. A key to the known species of Umairia Hayat is given, and additional distribution records of 10 species of aphelinids from India are also reported.
    Attribution
    Sagadai Manickavasagam, Chakaravarthy Menakadevi & Mani Ayyamperumal, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8893–8897 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2085.8.6.8893-8897
  • Title
    All that glitters is not gold: A projected distribution of the endemic Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) indicates a major range shrinkage due to future climate change
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Climate change has a perceived threat on biodiversity due to its effect on species range. Species with narrow ranges and highly specific climatic and habitat requirements are at higher risk. To understand the influence of climate change on the Indian endemic gekkonid, the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870) we model the present and future predicted distribution (2050 and 2070) under the CMIP5 RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios using MaxEnt under the HadGEM3-ES Model. Our analysis revealed the negative impact of climate change on the Indian Golden Gecko with a decrease in the amount of climatically suitable areas in the future, and an almost total range shrinkage by 2070. Despite its wide distribution in the eastern Deccan Peninsula, according to our predictions, the species is threatened by a shrinkage in the future range due to climate change.
    Attribution
    Aditya Srinivasulu & Chelmala Srinivasulu, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8883–8892 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2723.8.6.8883-8892
  • Title
    The Nilgiri Tahr (Mammalia: Cetartiodactyla: Bovidae: Nilgiritragus hylocrius Ogilby, 1838) in the Agastyamalai range, Western Ghats, India: population status and threats
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Nilgiri Tahr (Nilgiritragus hylocrius Ogilby, 1838) has not been comprehensively surveyed in the southern Western Ghats, India. Here we present results of a survey conducted in 2012 and 2013 in 25 sites where Nilgiri Tahr was reported in Agastyamalai range south of the Shencottah gap. The objectives of the survey were to assess population status; evaluate threats and propose conservation measures. In each site the geographical coordinates were noted. If Nilgiri Tahr (=Tahr) were sighted, the number and herd structure were recorded. Indirect signs of Tahr presence such as faecal pellets and feedback from local informants were noted in sites with no direct sightings of Tahr. The total sightings were 247 Tahr in 10 sites, and indication of Tahr presence in seven sites. Only two populations viz. Kalamalai-Varraiattumudi and Muthukulivayal-Balamore were large (>30 individuals). Tahr were not present in eight sites: of which four had earlier records of Tahr presence, and the other four had no prior data. There was a significant positive association between percentage of young (kids and yearlings) and number of Tahr sighted. Illegal hunting was widespread in the past, and continues to be a serious threat. Loss of Tahr grazing habitat to successional processes resulting in increased tree cover, is a long term threat that could increase with climate change. A landscape level management plan to reconnect small populations, rehabilitate Tahr in sites where they have disappeared, use fire to restore short grass habitats, and stringent curb on illegal hunting is required for the long term viability of the Nilgiri Tahr in this region.
    Attribution
    Ponniah Hopeland, Jean-Philippe Puyravaud & Priya Davidar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8877–8882 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2542.8.6.8877-8882
  • Title
    On the reproductive ecology of Suaeda maritima, S. monoica and S. nudiflora (Chenopodiaceae)

    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Floral biology, sexual system, breeding system, pollinators, fruiting and seed dispersal aspects of three Suaeda species, S. maritima, S. monoica and S. nudiflora (Chenopodiaceae) were studied. The flowers of all the three species are hermaphroditic, dichogamous, strongly protogynous with a pistillage phase during the mature bud stage and staminate phase following anthesis, self-compatible exhibiting mixed breeding systems with special adaptation for cross-pollination; but both self- and cross-pollination are vector-dependent. In all, the flowers display a mix of anemophilous and entomophilous traits. Anemophily is effective in high salt marshes while water currents bring about pollination in low salt marshes; insects pollinate the flowers while collecting the forage from pistillate and staminate phase flowers. In these species, the whole plant breaks off and rolls on the floor while shedding its diaspores. Fruits with seeds intact and/or seeds shed from fruits float on water due to their ability for buoyancy. The fruits and seeds thus disperse, settle in the entire extent of salt marshes or coastal areas and germinate in mid-summer season when salinity is very high in high and low salt marshes.
    Attribution
    A.J. Solomon Raju & Rajendra Kumar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8860–8876 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2275.8.6.8860-8876
  • Title
    Community and conservation reserves in southern India status, challenges and opportunities_Arun Kanagavel_GEM & IBP
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    Community and conservation reserves in southern India status, challenges and opportunities_Arun Kanagavel_GEM & IBP
  • Title
    A new cavernicolous assassin bug of the genus Bagauda Bergroth (Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Emesinae) from the Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new cavernicolous, thread-legged assassin bug, Bagauda ernstmayri sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Emesinae), collected from a cave near Satara, in the Western Ghats of Maharashtra, India, is described. Its interaction with the web of an uloborid spider Zosis geniculata (Olivier, 1789) (Araneae: Uloboridae) is discussed.
  • Title
    2015 Linking critical patches of sloth bear
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    2015 Linking critical patches of sloth bear