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1963 documents found
  • Title
    A report on some butterflies (Lepidoptera) from Ladakh in Jammu & Kashmir and Lahaul in Himachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Forty-two (42) species of butterflies were recorded from a short survey of Ladakh and Lahaul in the inner Himalaya in Jammu & Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh. Here, we provide location and altitude records for these species, data on their abundance, photo-documentation of the life cycle of Pieris deota and P. brassicae as well as the first published record of a larval host plant for P. deota. Twelve (12) of these species are protected under Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972.
    Attribution
    Sanjay Sondhi, Balakrishnan Valappil, Yash Sondhi & Anchal Sondhi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9971–9987 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3024.9.3.9971-9987
  • Title
    Macrofungi in two botanical gardens in southwestern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This study reports 11 species of macrofungi in the botanical garden and arboretum of Mangalore University. Frequent species include Clathrus delicatus, Entoloma serrulatum and Tetrapyrgos nigripes in the botanical garden, and Collybia aurea and T. nigripes in the arboretum. Five species are edible (Collybia aurea, Lepista sp., Russula adusta, R. atropurpurea and Termitomyces microcarpus), one is medicinal (T. microcarpus) and two are ectomycorrhizal (Russula adusta and R. atropurpurea) with critically endangered endemic tree species Vateria indica (Dipterocarpaceae). Some macrofungi grow on bark, woody litter and leaf litter, while others were found on typical lateritic soils with organic matter. Termitomyces microcarpus was common in the faecal pellets of termites in the botanical garden. Brief descriptions of species based on field and laboratory observations, along with their substrates and distribution, are given.
    Attribution
    Mundamoole Pavithra, Kandikere R. Sridhar & Ammatanda A. Greeshma, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9962–9970 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2747.9.3.9962-9970
  • Title
    Forest ghost moth fauna of northeastern India (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae: Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Taxonomic and biological information is reviewed for the forest Hepialidae of northeastern India, a poorly known group of moths in a region known for the global significance of its biodiversity. The taxonomic and biological characteristics are described for genera known from the northeast - Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus. A key is provided for distinguishing these genera and the genus Thitarodes known from nearby Bhutan, China, and Nepal, which is almost certainly present within the borders of India. Taxonomic characteristics are described for 12 species from the northeast along with illustrations of the species and maps of their known distributions. Information on species distributions is extremely fragmentary and it is considered very likely that most species have more extensive distributions than currently documented. The northeastern Indian region represents a center of hepialid diversity comprising three principal distribution patterns: (i) local endemics, (ii) Himalayan, and (iii) northeastern. Comparison of distribution records and major vegetation types indicate the absence of information on the hepialid fauna for much of the northeast region. The principal challenge for future documentation and assessment of the hepialid fauna for this region, as with any other part of India, is the lack of modern descriptions of type specimens. The inclusion of voucher collections of Hepialidae in future biodiversity surveys of northeastern India is to be strongly encouraged, particularly in the context of current and future environmental impacts affecting the sustainability of forest environments in the region.
    Attribution
    John R. Grehan & Vijay Anand Ismavel, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9940–9955 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3030.9.3.9940-9955
  • Title
    Ecology of marine macro algal flora of Visakhapatnam coastal areas, Bay of Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An ecological study was conducted on species composition, vertical distribution and monthly variations of marine macro algae along the Visakhapatnam coast, Bay of Bengal, India between May 2013 and April 2014. A total of 48 species was recorded, 18 species belonging to phylum Chlorophyta, nine species to Phaeophyta and 21 species to Rhodophyta. The phylum Rhodophyta was the most dominant group with the highest number of species composition (44.0%) followed by Chlorophyta (37.0%) and Phaeophyta (19.0%). Monthly seaweed distribution data showed the dominance of Rhodophyta members (43.75%) during November to February, when compared to that of Chlorophyta and Phaeophyta members. In addition, the data also revealed that the months from June to August contributed favourable conditions for the growth of Chlorophyta members (29.16%) when compared to that of other months. The present study has recorded two new species (Ulva lactuca and Enteromorpha intestinalis). Thirty-five species once recorded are absent from the Visakhapatnam coast. These changes are attributed to the impact of marine water pollution and climate change.
    Attribution
    I. Vishnupriya Sowjanya & P.S. Raja Sekhar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9911–9919 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2102.9.3.9911-9919
  • Title
    A comparative study of the diet of the Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Franklin, 1831) from two distinct habitats in the Tamil Nadu - Puducherry area, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A total of 166 prey items were identified from pellets, pellet remains and prey remains – 84 from Arunachala Hill and 82 from Pondicherry University campus. The total biomass encountered from pellet and prey remains was 22,620.17g – 11,240.59g from Arunachala and 11,379.58g from Pondicherry University. Out of the 166 prey items 102 were non-volant small mammals accounting for a biomass of 13,973.90g – 5,616.83g (49.94%) from Arunachala and 8,357.07g (73.42%) from Pondicherry University. Even among these murid rodents dominated – 44.99% in Arunachala and 70.13% in Pondy University. Milvus migrans were predated upon by Bubo bengalensis and 10 partly eaten carcasses were recovered – hence they could not be assigned a category as the quantity consumed could not be determined. It is a well known fact that Eagle Owls are intolerant to other avian predators, and territorial behaviour and intraguild aggression / predation could be responsible for this phenomenon. 3 other partly consumed remains of birds were also encountered and these too could not be assigned a category for the same reason that the quantity ingested could not be determined. Anurans occurred for a combined biomass of 12.87% in both areas. The rest, viz. Coleoptera, Orthoptera and Paratelphusa sp. accounted for a paltry biomass of 0.51%. The difference between murid rodents occurring in the two habitats was illuminating. In Arunachala the constant food of the owls were the field rodents Millardia meltada (15.47%), Bandicota bengalensis (8.74%) and Tatera indica (11.65%), and a single Bandicota indica (6.07%) which is a species found around rural habitations. The first two species were conspicuous by their absence in Pondicherry University and the Tatera indica was encountered in very small quantities (3.70%). Uniquely enough, the terrestrial and fossorial forms of urban rodents formed the basic food of Bubo bengalensis in Pondicherry University – Rattus rattus (20.64%) and Bandicota indica (43.94%). Both these species are human commensals and occur in pestilential proportions in urban habitats. The specific identity of Mus spp. could not be derived due to the complexity of identification, but as our specimens are housed in the repository of WILD molecular analysis could shed light on the species complex in the near future. We have compared non-volant small mammal prey of the regions we studied with those of Maharastra and the results are discussed.
    Attribution
    M. Eric Ramanujam, Tushita Singh, Tushita Singh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017);pp 9892-9902 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2438.9.3.9892-9902
  • Title
    DNA barcoding for identification of the enigmatic plant Ramkand
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    For several years, the exact identity of the Ramkand had been a curiosity for plant researchers and students. Even though the so-called kandmool or tuber is being sold for several years at various places, especially at places of pilgrimage, its source is one of the best kept secrets by its vendors. The name and information provided by the vendors give an impression, that the tubers were eaten by Lord Rama during his days of exile.
    Attribution
    CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 100, NO. 9, 10 MAY 2011
  • Title
    Report of Platythomisus octomaculatus (C. L. Koch, 1845) and Platythomisus sudeepi Biswas, 1977 from India (Araneae, Thomisidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    One of the species described in this article, Platythomisus octomaculatus, was observed and studied at the Makunda Christian Hospital through the activities of the "Makunda Nature Club"
    Attribution
    Taxonomic Paper
  • Title
    Nilssonia leithii (Gray 1872)- Leith's Softshell Turtle
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A species monograph of Leith's Softshell Turtle.
    Attribution
    Indraneil Das, Shashwat Sirsi, Karthikeyan Vasudevan and B.H.C.K. Murthy
  • Title
    Additions to the flora of Coimbatore hills, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The occurrence of Cosmostigma racemosum, Blachia umbellata and Vanilla walkeriae are being reported for the first time from Coimbatore hills.
    Attribution
    K. Kiruthika, M. Sulaiman & R. Gopalan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 2 (2017); pp. 9881–9884 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2991.9.2.9881-9884
  • Title
    New records of Aplousobranch ascidians to Indian waters from Andaman Islands
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Aplousobranchia represents the largest order under the class Ascidiacea. Two reef associated aplousobranch ascidians, Rhopalaea macrothorax Tokioka, 1953 under the family Diazonidae and Clavelina robusta Kott, 1990 under the family Clavelinidae, found from the Andaman group of islands are reported as new records to the Indian waters. The present paper describes the taxonomic characters and distribution of these two newly recorded species.
    Attribution
    Jhimli Mondal, C. Raghunathan & K. Venkataraman, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 2 (2017); pp. 9874–9880 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1876.9.2.9874-9880
  • Title
    First record of the predatory stinkbug Eocanthecona concinna (Walker, 1867) (Pentatomidae: Asopinae) from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The genus Eocanthecona is distributed in oriental, Ethiopian and Australasian regions. This genus is represented by 24 species from the world of which only five species are reported from India. The bug Eocanthecona concinna was first reported from Hong Kong, China in 1867. Later again reported from different regions of China and Taiwan in 1910, 1934, 1961 and 2013. The review of literature indicates no record of E. concinna in India. Hence, the report of this stinkbug from Kolhapur becomes first report for India and the geographic range of the species in China and Taiwan is extended towards India.
    Attribution
    Sadashiv Hanumant Waghmare & Sunil Madhukar Gaikwad, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 2 (2017); pp. 9870–9873 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3051.9.2.9870-9873
  • Title
    A century later the Manipur Argus Callerebia suroia Tytler, 1914 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) recorded in its type locality in Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present paper reports the sighting of Callerebia suroia Tytler, 1914 at Shirui Kashong Peak, Ukhrul District which confirms the continued presence of the species in Manipur State, India. The butterfly was sighted on 13 July 2016 near the footpath leading to the summit at an altitude of 2,330m. Callerebia suroia Tytler, 1914 is protected under Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972. The sighting of such very rare species in Manipur after a decade shows that more surveys are needed in the hills and valleys of Manipur to determine the butterfly fauna of the region.
    Attribution
    Jatishwor Singh Irungbam, Harmenn Huidrom & Baleshwor Singh Soibam, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 2 (2017); pp. 9866–9869 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2931.9.2.9866-9869