A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

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2036 documents found
  • Title
    Sighting of Purple-throated-, or Van Hasselt’s Sunbird Leptocoma sperata brasiliana in Karimganj District, Assam, with notes on its status in India
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Describes the observation of the Van Hasselt's Sunbird in Karimganj District of Assam with the first photographic record of this species in India and a discussion of previous records with details of geograhical locations.
    Attribution
    Ismavel, V. A., & Praveen J., 2015. Sighting of Purple-throated-, or Van Hasselt’s Sunbird Leptocoma sperata brasiliana in Karimganj District, Assam, with notes on its status in India. Indian BIRDS 10 (3&4): 104–108.
  • Title
    Avifaunal diversity in Assam University Campus, Silchar, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We conducted a bird survey in the Assam University campus, Silchar from February 2011 to June 2011. A total of 73 species of birds belonging to 56 genera, 32 families and 13 orders was recorded. Significantly, the highest number of bird species restricted to only one particular habitat (17 species) was recorded in the forest area called ‘eco-forest’ (χ2=18, df=3, P<0.01). The highest similarity of bird species was found between degraded area and secondary growth area, and the lowest was found between eco-forest and degraded area. Species richness and dominance of species were more in the eco-forest area. The diversity of species was more in the secondary growth area. Red-vented Bulbul, Spotted Dove and Red-whiskered Bulbul were the most abundant and frequent bird species found in campus. The avifaunal diversity in the study area shows the importance of the University campus as an ideal bird habitat.
    Attribution
    Chakdar Biswajit, Choudhury Parthankar, Singha Hilloljyoti (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8369-8378; doi:10.11609/jott.2524.8.1.8369-8378
  • Title
    Distribution, habitat utilisation and conservation status of the freshwater crab, Somanniathelphusa zanklon Ng & Dudgeon, 1992 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae) endemic to Hong Kong
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Somanniathelphusa zanklon Ng & Dudgeon, 1992 is a tropical freshwater crab currently considered endemic to Hong Kong.  The present study shows that S. zanklon has been found in a variety of lotic and lentic habitats, mostly lowland, slow moving streams and marshes.  The species is more widely distributed than previously known, and potentially occurs outside Hong Kong.  However, its habitat is under threat from development and channelization of watercourses.  The life cycle of the crab requires both slow moving streams and marshes for adults and adjacent terrestrial habitats for brooding females, highlighting the need for integrated conservation of lowland streams and their riparian corridors.  It is hoped that understanding of the species habitat requirements will encourage others to further explore lowland watercourses in the Pearl River Delta and aid in habitat conservation. 
    Attribution
    Stanton David J., Leven Michael R.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 3 (2016) 26/3/2016; pp. 8564-8574; 10.11609/jott.2070.8.3.8564-8574
  • Title
    Seasonal variations in food plant preferences of reintroduced Rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perrissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae) in Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The food preferences of translocated Rhinos in Manas National Park were studied to find out variations in seasonal and annual preferences. A total of 139 plants species belonging to 39 families were observed to be consumed as food. On an average, grasses (n=33) contributed 24% of Rhino food, aquatic plants (n=23) 16.5%, shrubs (n=11) 7.5%, herbs (n = 31) 22.3% trees (n=26) 18.7%, creepers (n=3) 2.1% and agricultural crops (n=12) 8.6%. Among the grasses, throughout the year Arundo donax, Cynodon dactylon, Imperata cylindrica, Saccharum elephantinus and Saccharum spontaneum were the maximum preferred species. Rhinos were observed to browse shrubs and tree twigs during the winter season and browsing was found to be very limited during the monsoon due to the abundance of young grass. Various anthropogenic pressures such as unregulated grassland burning, cattle grazing, invasions of Bombax ceiba and shrubs like Chromolaena odorata, Leea asiatica and herbs like Ageratum conyzoides have degraded some of the important grasslands. So, a proper grassland management protocol including the burning of grasslands during the dry season, keeping grazing animals away and control of weeds is suggested in the areas extensively used by the Rhinos.
    Attribution
    Deba Kumar Dutta, Pranab Jyoti Bora, Rita Mahanta, Amit Sharma & Anindya Swargowari, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 13 (2016); pp. 9525–9536 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2486.8.13.9525-9536
  • Title
    Traditional home garden agroforestry systems: habitat for conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus (Passeriformes: Ploceidae) in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was conducted in 18 homegarden agroforestry systems of Assam to assess the role in the conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus. Observations were made on the type of host trees, location of host trees, their spatial arrangement pattern, height and diameter of host trees chosen for nesting and the number of complete and helmet stage nests. Trail walks were employed for assessing the encounter rates of predators. A total of 2357 individuals of potential host trees for nesting of P. philippinus were found belonging to Areca catechu (2272), Cocos nucifera (56), Phoenix sylvasticus (13) and Borassus flabellifer (16). According to the spatial arrangement pattern of host trees, among 2272 individuals of A. catechu, 96.5% (n=2192) and 3.5% (n=80) of individuals were arranged in block and row pattern respectively. The other three host trees were arranged in single pattern. Among these 80 individuals of A. catechu planted in row pattern, 47.5% (n=38) had nests (complete and helmet stage) on them. In total, 293 nests (both complete and helmet stage) were observed in A. catechu, out of which, 46.1% (n=135) were complete nests. The other three host trees had nests in various stages of development but none of them were completed by P. philippinus. The encounter rates of predators (arboreal mammals) was significantly higher in block patterns (2.56 ± 0.51) as compared to row patterns (0.53 ± 0.17) of host tree spatial arrangement whereas, the encounter rates of reptiles showed no statistical difference among the two patterns of host tree arrangement. Thus, A. catechu planted in row pattern was the most preferred host tree species for nesting by P. philippinus as compared to the other three host tree species. The height and DBH of A. catechu trees having nests varied from seven to 11 m (7.8 ± 1.11) and 10.5–16.5 cm (12.6 ± 1.4) respectively. The homegarden agroforestry systems provided suitable habitat for survival of P. philippinus as this system has ample water sources, feeding grounds, nesting material and host tree sources and conservation attitudes of the homegarden owners, thus, suggesting that homegarden agroforestry system can be a potential site for conservation of P. philippinus in human-modified land use.
    Attribution
    Yashmita-Ulman, Awadhesh Kumar & Madhubala Sharma, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10076–10083 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3090.9.4.10076-10083
  • Title
    Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV) to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21%) of the non-human primate samples and three (75%) human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living) was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05). No significant difference (p=0.86) was seen between male and female non-human primates
    Attribution
    Nath B.G., Chakraborty A., Sarma D.K., Rahman T., Boro P.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(5) pp. 4722-4724; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3121.4722-4
  • Title
    3rd NORTHEAST BUTTERFLY MEET- 2016
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Northeast Butterfly Meet is organized by Butterflies of North-eastern India is a group. It is an annual gathering of butterfly enthusiasts in the region. The meet encourages participation of young students at minimal cost so that the students get the opportunity to study butterflies in best sites with special training from experts. Most sites of Northeast India are data deficient. The annual event aims to conduct meetings in best sites in different landscapes which will further provide database and help in conservation of the landscape.
  • Title
    First record of hagfish (Cyclostomata: Myxinidae) in Indian waters
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    One specimen of hag fish Eptatretus sp. was collected from the Arabian Sea, off Kerala coast of India at 500-600 m depth. The phylogenetic analysis using the sequence of mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase C (CO1) suggested theEptatretussp.collected from Indiais distinct from all other species where sequence data is available and P ID (Liberal) forEptatretus sp.collected from Indiais 0.96, indicating a high probability that an unknown member of the putative species would be correctly identified as a member once more specimens are collected.
    Attribution
    B. Fernholm, A. Biju Kumar & Michael Norén, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10365–10368 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2526.9.6.10365-10368
  • Title
    Taxonomic note about Willow Ermine Moth Yponomeuta rorrellus Hübner (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae) from Ladakh division of Jammu & Kashmir, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Yponomeuta rorrellus (Hübner, 1796) is considered a monophagous pest of the willow plantation (Salix spp.) in Drass and Leh districts of Ladakh Division (Jammu & Kashmir), with its peak activity recorded during the months of July and August. The taxonomic study of the species is presented here for the first time.
    Attribution
    Mudasir Ahmad Dar, Shahid Ali Akbar & Govindasamy Mahendiran, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10361–10364 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2995.9.6.10361-10364
  • Title
    A new locality record of the rare Anomalous Nawab Polyura agrarius (Swinhoe, 1887) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Charaxinae) from central India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Polyura agrarius(Swinhoe, 1887), known as the Anomalous Nawab, is a wide-ranging but localized and rare species in India; there are only a handful records from central India. The only specimen-based record of this species from Madhya Pradesh, India is by Charles Swinhoe in 1886, which is the basis of its original description. This paper reports a new locality record for Polyura agrariusfrom Jabalpur, central India along with a review of earlier records from the region.
    Attribution
    Deepika Mehra, Jagatjot Singh Flora & Vivek Sharma, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10358–10360 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2972.9.6.10358-10360
  • Title
    First records of butterflies Anthene emolus emolus (Godart, [1924]) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatinae) and Gandaca harina assamica Moore, [1906] (Lepidoptera: Pieridae: Coliadinae) from Kumaon, Uttarakhand, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Reporting the range extension of the Common Ciliate Blue Anthene emolus emolus and the Tree Yellow Gandaca harina assamica to the Kumaon Himalaya in India
    Attribution
    Sanjay Sondhi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10355–10357 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3233.9.6.10355-10357
  • Title
    A new record of Tenodera fasciata (Olivier, 1792) (Insecta: Mantodea: Mantidae: Mantinae) for western India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Tenodera fasciata (Olivier, 1792) is reported for the first time from the Western Ghats. The present record extends its known geographical range notably from the east towards western India for about 1,400km. The finding of only two specimens in two years suggests its rarity.
    Attribution
    Gopal Ambrushi Raut & Sunil Madhukar Gaikwad, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10351–10354 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2908.9.6.10351-10354