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1946 documents found
  • Title
    Leaping frogs (Anura: Ranixalidae) of the Western Ghats of India: An integrated taxonomic review
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Leaping frogs of the family Ranixalidae are endemic to the Western Ghats of India and are currently placed in a single genus, Indirana. Based on specimens collected from their entire range and a comprehensive study of type material defining all known species, we propose a revised taxonomy for the leaping frogs using an integrative approach including an analysis of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear rhodopsin genes, as well as multivariate morphometrics. Both genetic and morphological analyses suggest that the genus Indirana is paraphyletic and a distinct monophyletic group, Walkerana gen. nov is described herein. The new genus is separated from Indirana sensu stricto by an apomorphic character state of reduced webbing, with one phalange free on the first and second toe (vs. no free phalanges), two phalanges free on the third and fifth toe (vs. one free phalange), and three phalanges free on the fourth toe (vs. 2–2½ phalanges free). This review includes (i) identification of lectotypes and redescription of three species of the genus Walkerana; (ii) identification of lectotypes for Indirana beddomii and I. semipalmata and their redescription; (iii) redescription of I. brachytarsus and I. gundia; and (iv) descriptions of four new species, namely, I. duboisi and I. tysoni from north of the Palghat gap, and I. yadera and I. sarojamma from south of the Palghat gap; and (iv) a key to the genera and species in the family Ranixalidae.
    Attribution
    Neelesh Dahanukar, Nikhil Modak, Keerthi Krutha, P.O. Nameer, Anand D. Padhye & Sanjay Molur, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 10 (2016); pp. 9221–9288 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2532.8.10.9221-9288
  • Title
    Wildlife Identification Book - Pench Reserve Forest
    Type
    Book
    Description
    Contains not only identification but also description of the flora, fauna and wildlife found in Pench Tiger Reserve
    Attribution
    this is a book which has been published by the Pench Wildlife Conservation Pratishthan
  • Title
    Singalila National Park - Interpretation Center Posters
    Type
    Poster
    Description
    Posters created by ATREE for the West Bengal Forest Department to display at the Interpretation Center at Manebhanjyang
  • Title
    Report on range extension of eight lesser known avian species from Durgapur. Ecoregion, West Bengal, India.
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Abstract The present study reports eight avian species from Durgapur (23.48°N, 87.32°E) which has not been previously reported from this ecoregion. During a duration of two years of continuous study 186 different bird species were identified and recorded from the present study location. Durgapur ecoregion comprises of heterogeneous habitat patches which unmistakably supports higher bird diversity. Of the eight newly recorded bird species Mirafra erythroptera was most abundant. Mirafra erythroptera, Prinia sylvatica, Dumetia hyperythra and Zapornia fusca were recorded to appear throughout the year while Larus ichthyaetus and Otus brucei only appeared in the winter and Emberiza melanocephala and Muscicapa ruficauda were recorded as passage migrants (autumn and spring respectively). Again Mirafra erythroptera, Otus brucei and Emberiza melanocephala were recorded from grasslands and Prinia sylvatica, Dumetia hyperythra, Larus ichthyaetus, Muscicapa ruficauda and Zapornia fusca were recorded from wetland habitat types respectively. More extensive studies on avian species will surely enrich our knowledge about their diversity, distribution pattern and range extension from the present study location.
  • Title
    Two additions to the flora of the Palni Hills, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Hiptage parvifolia Wight & Arn. (Malpighiaceae) and Kalanchoe olivacea Dalz. & Gibs. (Crassulaceae) are collected and reported for the first time from the Palni hills of Western Ghats from Tamil Nadu, India. This paper provided a detailed taxonomic description, distribution, illustrations and photographs for their easy identification.
    Attribution
    S. Soosairaj, P. Raja, B. Balaguru & T. Dons, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9216–9220 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2349.8.9.9216-9220
  • Title
    Notes on three species of Palaearctic satyrinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) from northwestern Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Observations are presented on local abundance, habitat and distribution of three species of lesser known Satyrinae butterflies in India, namely the Oriental Meadowbrown Hyponephele cheena Moore, 1865 from Chamba district in Himachal Pradesh, the Yellow Wall Kirinia eversmanni cashmierensis Moore, 1874 from Handwara, Jammu & Kashmir and the comparison of the Tawny Meadowbrown, Hyponephele pulchella Felder & Felder, 1867 from Gulmarg, Jammu & Kashmir with its congeners (Hyonephele pulchra, H.astorica, H. Baroghila, H.sylvia & H. coenonympha).
    Attribution
    Arun P. Singh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9208–9215 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2458.8.9.9208-9215
  • Title
    New records of polypores (Basidiomycota: Aphyllophorales) from the southern Western Ghats with an identification key for polypores in Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India

    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study reports new distribution records of two species of polypores; Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Jacq.) P. Karst. and Datronia mollis (Sommerf.) Donk under family polyporaceae from the moist deciduous forests of southern Western Ghats, Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala. This paper also provides detailed macro-morphology and micro-morphology of newly recorded fungi and key for identification of polypores reported from the study area. An opportunistic sampling was carried out along with the plot based sampling in order to maximize the documentation of polypore distribution. A total of 36 polypore species in 21 genera belonging to six families were recorded throughout the entire study period of 2012–2014. Out of these, 26 species were annuals and 10 species perennials. Thirty-four polypores were identified as white rotting and two species were brown rotting.
    Attribution
    A. Muhammed Iqbal, Kattany Vidyasagaran & P. Narayan Ganesh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9198–9207 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2553.8.9.9198-9207
  • Title
    Effect of vehicular traffic on wild animals in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The construction of a road, directly and indirectly, impacts on the ecosystems where the road is built. Highways passing through national reserves/wildlife sanctuaries have an adverse impact on wild animals. The present survey was conducted to estimate the road kills on the state highways passing through the Nilgiri north territorial forest division (19km) and Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (15km) in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India. The road kills were monitored three times a month between July 2013 and December 2013 (six months) and a total of 176 road kills belonging to 30 species were recorded. Reptiles were the most affected taxa (39%), followed by mammals (33%) and birds (21%). Amphibians were least affected by vehicular traffic and comprised 7% of the total kills. According to road stretch category, the overall road kill was N=135 in the forested area and N=41 in human habitations. A total of 812 food materials were encounterd 612km with average of 1.32 food materials / km. Conservation and management implications are essential to prevent the local extinction of wildlife.
    Attribution
    A. Samson, B. Ramakrishnan, A. Veeramani, P. Santhoshkumar, S. Karthick, G. Sivasubramanian, M. Ilakkia, A. Chitheena, J. Leona Princy & P. Ravi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9182–9189 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1962.8.9.9182-9189
  • Title
    The decline of the interspecific agonistic displays in an adult female Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae): a case of habituation to human approach
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Habituation to humans was observed in a single breeding female Bubo bengalensis and the responses documented. It was observed that owls recognize threats, and differentiate between people. The data shows how ‘familiarity’ can result in reduced flight range and agonistic displays. It was found that the most familiar observers elucidated the least response to human intrusion whereas the role of unfamiliar intrusion had an adverse affect which prevented further studies of the subject.
    Attribution
    M. Eric Ramanujam, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9177–9181 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2485.8.9.9177-9181
  • Title
    On the status of the Long-tailed Marmot Marmota caudata (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Kargil, Ladakh (Indian Trans-Himalaya)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Two species of marmots occur in India, the Himalayan Marmot Marmota himalayana and the Long-tailed Marmot or Golden Marmot Marmota caudata. Marmots constitute part of the diet of some globally endangered carnivores in the Trans-Himalaya, yet studies on marmots in India are scanty. Besides, the status of the Long-tailed Marmot is still unknown in India. Considering this, a survey was carried out in Rangdum Valley, Kargil between May and July 2011 to collect baseline information on the Long-tailed Marmot. Trails and roads were explored through walk and slow moving vehicle, respectively. The Long-tailed Marmot was found to have a density of 14.31±2.10 per sq.km. and an encounter rate of 2.86±0.42 per km. Most of the observations of Long-tailed Marmot were in hilly areas (77.7%), lower slope (48.8%) and herbaceous meadow (38.0%). The current information is expected to bring concern towards this lesser known species in India.
    Attribution
    Tanveer Ahmed, Mohammad Shoeb, Pankaj Chandan & Afifullah Khan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9171–9176 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2731.8.9.9171-9176
  • Title
    Pollination ecology and fruiting behavior of Pavetta indica L. (Rubiaceae), a keystone shrub species in the southern Eastern Ghats forest, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pavetta indica is a massive bloomer for a brief period in May. The flowers are hermaphroditic, strikingly protandrous, self and cross-compatible, nectariferous and psychophilous. They possess secondary pollen presentation mechanism as a device to avoid autonomous autogamy but it does not prevent geitonogamy. The fruit set largely occurs through geitonogamy and xenogamy. Butterflies, especially papilionids, pierids, nymphalids, and sphingid hawk moth pollinate the flowers while collecting nectar. Honey bees and blue-banded digger bees feed on pollen and effect only accidental pollination. The nectar is sucrose-rich and contains essential and non-essential amino acids. Birds are seed dispersal agents. Seeds are non-dormant and germinate readily during rainy season but their continued growth and establishment is subject to the availability of soil moisture and nutrients. The plant is not able to populate itself in its natural area. The local uses of different parts of the plant have been found to be affecting its reproductive success and natural regeneration rate. Therefore, regulation of the uses of this plant is recommended for its survival and restoration of its population size in the natural areas due to its role as a keystone species for bees and butterflies during dry season.
    Attribution
    A.J. Solomon Raju, M. Mallikarjuna Rao, K. Venkata Ramana, C. Prasada Rao & M. Sulakshana, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9155–9170 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2340.8.9.9155-9170
  • Title
    Indigenous ornamental freshwater ichthyofauna of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve, India: status and prospects
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ornamental fishes are the most popular pet throughout the world and high demand for these fishes has made them an important component of the world fish trade. India contributes a very meager percentage to the world ornamental fish trade; but considering the high ichthyofaunal diversity it has the potential to compete with the world’s leading ornamental fish producers in the near future. Sundarban Biosphere Reserve has abundant waterbodies with rich fish diversity. Although some research has been carried out on ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban; detailed documentation on freshwater indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of this region is still not available. To fill this knowledge gap, the present study has been conducted to list the indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve along with their conservation status and their prospective utilization for improved livelihood of local communities. Eighty four species belonging to 11 orders, 28 families and 59 genera were collected from the study area with species representing the order Cypriniformes dominating the ichthyofauna. Nine species have been listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. Indigenous fish species of the Sundarban having great potential to support domestic as well as the international ornamental fish trade from India in near future. The ornamental fish species would also be able to generate alternate livelihood options for the impecunious communities of the Sundarban. However, serious concern must also be paid to the conservation of these fish species as some of them are under near threatened categories of IUCN Red list.
    Attribution
    Sandipan Gupta, Sourabh Kumar Dubey, Raman Kumar Trivedi, Bimal Kinkar Chand & Samir Banerjee, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9144–9154 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1888.8.9.9144-9154