A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

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2036 documents found
  • Title
    Livestock and wild herbivores in the western Himalaya: competition or co-existence?
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pastoralism is among the major land use practices in the Himalaya and the main source of livelihood for local communities. In naturally occurring herbivore populations, the co-occurrence of native species has evolved through evolutionary processes over millions of years which has enabled coexistence. In the modern scenario, however, the intrusion of livestock into the wild habitats impose additional pressure on the limited resources, given that there has been insufficient time for resource partitioning to evolve. Realizing the need to develop a better understanding of wild herbivores and livestock interactions, the present review was compiled. The review demonstrates that a group of similar species using similar habitats and feeding on similar foods leads to more competition. Also, goat/sheep impose a potential threat to the resource of wild herbivores and such resource exploitation by livestock is not compatible with their conservation. Further, wild herbivores shift their habitat to avoid the risk of being exposed to competition or predation. Livestock grazing and associated activities affect the wild herbivores’ habitat use and foraging behaviour, and these are changes that may also affect their survival in the future. There is a prime need to find out the threshold of livestock population which can sustain itself without compromising livestock production and wildlife. High conflict areas need to be identified and compensatory mechanisms should evolve. It is also necessary for ecology to be integrated with an understanding of the social dynamics that influence the status of the resources.
    Attribution
    Syed, Z. & M.S. Khan (2017). Livestock and wild herbivores in the western Himalaya: competition or co-existence? Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4): 10084–10088; http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3279.9.4.10084-10088
  • Title
    Butterflies associated with major forest types in Arunachal Pradesh (eastern Himalaya), India: implications for ecotourism and conservation planning
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A three year study (from December 2011 to December 2014 and in June 2015) on butterflies covering four major forest sub-types as classified by H.G. Champion & S.K. Seth in 1968 in ‘Forest Types of India’, which occupy 60% of the forest area lying below 2,500m across Arunachal Pradesh State in the eastern Himalaya of India, revealed 415 taxa belonging to six families (Hesperiidae: 74 species of 42 genera; Papilionidae: 37 species of 10 genera; Pieridae: 36 species of 15 genera; Lycaenidae: 85 species of 49 genera; Riodinidae: 7 species of 3 genera & Nymphalidae: 176 species of 71 genera, respectively). These included many endemic and rare species typical of these forest sub-types, i.e., (i) 2B/1S1 Sub-Himalayan Light Alluvial Semi-Evergreen Forest (32 species), (ii) 2B/ C1(a) Assam Alluvial Plains Semi-Evergreen Forests (5 species), (iii) 2B/2S2 Eastern Alluvial Secondary Semi-Evergreen Forests- (15 species) and (iv) 3/1S2 (b) Terminalia-Duabanga (3 species), respectively. The relative number of species and individuals sampled were the highest at altitudes below 500m, and gradually declined as the altitude increased to 2,000m, and above 2,500m species richness declined sharply. The number of species and their relative abundance were the highest during July–August (Monsoon-first peak) and then again in November-December (Autumn-second peak), while the numbers were lowest during winter. These findings suggest that these four forest types are important both for the purpose of ecotourism as well as conservation of endemic and rare taxa found in the eastern Himalaya and northeastern India at altitudes below 2,000m. A complete list of all the taxa sampled is given along with relative abundance status during sampling, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 status, and distribution in different forest types in the state. Ten potential butterfly ecotourism zones are suggested for the state. Planning land-use for biodiversity conservation based on butterfly-forest type associations, by taking forest sub-types as units of conservation, is suggested as an option for the eastern Himalaya.
    Attribution
    Arun P. Singh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10047–10075 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2765.9.4.10047-10075
  • Title
    Migratory and resident birds of Kawadi-Pat wetland
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Kawadi-Pat is a wetland under human impact. Once a paradise of winter migratory birds, one hour distance from Pune city. Now, in spite of filthy environment, we can see some spp of migratory birds. I felt very bad by the state of this wetland. Here is a presentation of whatever I could find that early morning on 24-11-2013.
  • Title
    Fauna found along Satara-Gondawale road 2014-15
    Type
    Report
    Description
    I was not expecting much on this road going through a rain-shadow area of Satara Dist. During rainy season, I found bees on seasonal herbs, during winter I found migratory and resident birds, during spring I found bees on the trees in full bloom. I do not know scientific names of many species of bugs, ants, bees, lizard... Please check and suggest the names. Thanks for visiting.
  • Title
    Flowers of small scale plantation along Satara-Gondawale road
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    This rainshadow zone is mainly rural area. Its a two way rough road. I have documented flowers which I noticed on the trees planted by local governing body or FD and rural huts-homes' kitchen garden.
  • Title
    Preliminary Phytochemical Screening, Antioxidant and Antifungal Activity of Lepidagathis cuspidate
    Type
    Journal Article
  • Title
    Wild flowers along Satara-Gondawale road
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    These wild flowers I noticed along the Satara-Gondawale road. They were not planted. This rain shadow area surprisingly is home to many species of wild flowers.
  • Title
    Agro-biodiversity of Satara-Gondawale road
    Type
    Report
    Description
    This rain shadow area is a typical rural area of Maharashtra. There are few towns in between, otherwise displaying agriculture on both sides of the roads. The road is flanked by old trees planted by either forest dept or local gram-panchayats. The area has no industrial zone so fresh, pure air and blue azur skies in winter. In summer, the farmland is given rest. During rainy season we see grass shoots and later the Kharip crop. During winter, we see Rabbi crop and variety of vegetables. This is the time to see some migratory birds along with local resident birds.
  • Title
    Special features of Satara-Gondawale road
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    I chose this road for photo-documentation to see the difference in flora and fauna of this rain shadow draught prone area and that of Rock outcrops of same Satara district - Kas, Mahabaleshwar, Panchgani, Chalkewadi etc. It was an year of amazing experience 2014-15.
  • Title
    Blooming non-native trees in Pune city 2015-16
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    TO study the origin of tree spp from the field guide books by Dr. Mahajan written in Marathi, I documented both native and non-native spp in bloom. I came to know that I had taken some common spp for granted as native. This is a pdf which contains flowering non native trees and other habit plants during 2015-16.
  • Title
    Flowers of native plants in Pune, Maharashtra.
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    Pune city - a largest city in WG, has maximum green cover and tree bio-diversity. I am fortunate to live in this city. I tried to photodocument the flowering trees during 2015-16 year round. I have segregated the species into native and exotic (non-native) This pdf contains flowers of native spp.
  • Title
    A first report of the presence of the Indian Wild Pig Sus scrofa cristatus from Kajinag Range, Kashmir, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Eurasian wild pig Sus scrofa is a widely distributed terrestrial mammal. In India, wild pig occurs from peninsular to north India. In Jammu and Kashmir, wild pig was naturally distributed in Jammu region but is mostly introduced in the Kashmir valley and became common along the eastern foothills of Kashmir mountains with Dachigam NP holding the core population. But there have been no reports of its occurrence in northern foothills of Kashmir. We for the first time report the presence of wild pig in the Limber and Lacchipora Wildlife Sanctuaries of the Kajinag Range in northern Kashmir.
    Attribution
    Riyaz Ahmad, Intesar Suhail & Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 10018–10020 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2713.9.3.10018-10020