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1963 documents found
  • Title
    Effect of vehicular traffic on wild animals in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The construction of a road, directly and indirectly, impacts on the ecosystems where the road is built. Highways passing through national reserves/wildlife sanctuaries have an adverse impact on wild animals. The present survey was conducted to estimate the road kills on the state highways passing through the Nilgiri north territorial forest division (19km) and Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (15km) in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India. The road kills were monitored three times a month between July 2013 and December 2013 (six months) and a total of 176 road kills belonging to 30 species were recorded. Reptiles were the most affected taxa (39%), followed by mammals (33%) and birds (21%). Amphibians were least affected by vehicular traffic and comprised 7% of the total kills. According to road stretch category, the overall road kill was N=135 in the forested area and N=41 in human habitations. A total of 812 food materials were encounterd 612km with average of 1.32 food materials / km. Conservation and management implications are essential to prevent the local extinction of wildlife.
    Attribution
    A. Samson, B. Ramakrishnan, A. Veeramani, P. Santhoshkumar, S. Karthick, G. Sivasubramanian, M. Ilakkia, A. Chitheena, J. Leona Princy & P. Ravi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9182–9189 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1962.8.9.9182-9189
  • Title
    The decline of the interspecific agonistic displays in an adult female Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae): a case of habituation to human approach
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Habituation to humans was observed in a single breeding female Bubo bengalensis and the responses documented. It was observed that owls recognize threats, and differentiate between people. The data shows how ‘familiarity’ can result in reduced flight range and agonistic displays. It was found that the most familiar observers elucidated the least response to human intrusion whereas the role of unfamiliar intrusion had an adverse affect which prevented further studies of the subject.
    Attribution
    M. Eric Ramanujam, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9177–9181 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2485.8.9.9177-9181
  • Title
    On the status of the Long-tailed Marmot Marmota caudata (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Kargil, Ladakh (Indian Trans-Himalaya)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Two species of marmots occur in India, the Himalayan Marmot Marmota himalayana and the Long-tailed Marmot or Golden Marmot Marmota caudata. Marmots constitute part of the diet of some globally endangered carnivores in the Trans-Himalaya, yet studies on marmots in India are scanty. Besides, the status of the Long-tailed Marmot is still unknown in India. Considering this, a survey was carried out in Rangdum Valley, Kargil between May and July 2011 to collect baseline information on the Long-tailed Marmot. Trails and roads were explored through walk and slow moving vehicle, respectively. The Long-tailed Marmot was found to have a density of 14.31±2.10 per sq.km. and an encounter rate of 2.86±0.42 per km. Most of the observations of Long-tailed Marmot were in hilly areas (77.7%), lower slope (48.8%) and herbaceous meadow (38.0%). The current information is expected to bring concern towards this lesser known species in India.
    Attribution
    Tanveer Ahmed, Mohammad Shoeb, Pankaj Chandan & Afifullah Khan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9171–9176 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2731.8.9.9171-9176
  • Title
    Pollination ecology and fruiting behavior of Pavetta indica L. (Rubiaceae), a keystone shrub species in the southern Eastern Ghats forest, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pavetta indica is a massive bloomer for a brief period in May. The flowers are hermaphroditic, strikingly protandrous, self and cross-compatible, nectariferous and psychophilous. They possess secondary pollen presentation mechanism as a device to avoid autonomous autogamy but it does not prevent geitonogamy. The fruit set largely occurs through geitonogamy and xenogamy. Butterflies, especially papilionids, pierids, nymphalids, and sphingid hawk moth pollinate the flowers while collecting nectar. Honey bees and blue-banded digger bees feed on pollen and effect only accidental pollination. The nectar is sucrose-rich and contains essential and non-essential amino acids. Birds are seed dispersal agents. Seeds are non-dormant and germinate readily during rainy season but their continued growth and establishment is subject to the availability of soil moisture and nutrients. The plant is not able to populate itself in its natural area. The local uses of different parts of the plant have been found to be affecting its reproductive success and natural regeneration rate. Therefore, regulation of the uses of this plant is recommended for its survival and restoration of its population size in the natural areas due to its role as a keystone species for bees and butterflies during dry season.
    Attribution
    A.J. Solomon Raju, M. Mallikarjuna Rao, K. Venkata Ramana, C. Prasada Rao & M. Sulakshana, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9155–9170 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2340.8.9.9155-9170
  • Title
    Indigenous ornamental freshwater ichthyofauna of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve, India: status and prospects
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ornamental fishes are the most popular pet throughout the world and high demand for these fishes has made them an important component of the world fish trade. India contributes a very meager percentage to the world ornamental fish trade; but considering the high ichthyofaunal diversity it has the potential to compete with the world’s leading ornamental fish producers in the near future. Sundarban Biosphere Reserve has abundant waterbodies with rich fish diversity. Although some research has been carried out on ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban; detailed documentation on freshwater indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of this region is still not available. To fill this knowledge gap, the present study has been conducted to list the indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve along with their conservation status and their prospective utilization for improved livelihood of local communities. Eighty four species belonging to 11 orders, 28 families and 59 genera were collected from the study area with species representing the order Cypriniformes dominating the ichthyofauna. Nine species have been listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. Indigenous fish species of the Sundarban having great potential to support domestic as well as the international ornamental fish trade from India in near future. The ornamental fish species would also be able to generate alternate livelihood options for the impecunious communities of the Sundarban. However, serious concern must also be paid to the conservation of these fish species as some of them are under near threatened categories of IUCN Red list.
    Attribution
    Sandipan Gupta, Sourabh Kumar Dubey, Raman Kumar Trivedi, Bimal Kinkar Chand & Samir Banerjee, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9144–9154 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1888.8.9.9144-9154
  • Title
    On the Behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica in southern West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Ganga River Dolphin Platanista gangetica Roxburgh, 1801 is a globally endangered cetacean found in the River system of Ganga, Brahmaputra and Meghna in Bangladesh and India. A survey and research were conducted from 2012–2014 to explore the behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Dolphin in the lower, middle and upper stretches of the river Ganga and its tributaries in southern West Bengal. The study recorded different types of surfacing patterns with respect to their age class as well as on diurnal activity pattern of the individual. The adults and sub-adults were found to have different types of surfacing during different hours of the day. The morning and afternoon were observed to be feeding hours of the Dolphin. Multiple potential threats were encountered during the present study such as destructive fishing gears, dumping of solid and municipal waste, industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, construction of water structures, water extraction and reduction of river depth attributed to siltation. These factors contributed to the present study of the river dolphins in the Ganga, which are localised at certain pockets in good number.
    Attribution
    Mahua Roy Chowdhury, Sangita Mitra & Saswati Sen, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9131–9137 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1752.8.9.9131-9137
  • Title
    Sighting of Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus in Telineelapuram Community Reserve, Srikakulam District, Andhra Pradesh
    Type
    Report
    Description
    In this note we wish to report a new site record of the Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus from Telineelapuram (18.57°N, 84.26°E), an Important Bird Area (hereinafter, IBA) in Srikakulam District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The Lesser Adjutant is a Vulnerable species (Birdlife International 2015), and a rare visitor to Andhra Pradesh (Ali 1934b; Luthin 1987).
  • Title
    A Leucistic Indian Rock Python, Python molurus (Linnaeus 1758), from Andhra Pradesh, India
    Type
    Report
    Description
    The Indian Rock Python, Python molurus (Linnaeus 1758), is a large non-venomous snake found in much of tropicaland subtropical southern and southeastern Asia. The species is widely distributed on the Indian Subcontinent (Smith 1943;Das 2002; Whitaker and Captain 2004, 2008) and has been categorized as Schedule-I in the Indian Wildlife Protection Act of 1972, is listed in CITES Appendix I (CITES 2016), but has not been assessed for the IUCN Red List since the recent elevation of P. bivittatus (Jacobs et al. 2009), which had been considered a subspecies of P. molurus.
  • Title
    Sighting of Red-Breasted Parakeet Psittacula alexandri (Linnaeus, 1758) at Hyderabad, Telangana, Southern India
    Type
    Report
    Description
    A single individual species of Red-Breasted Parakeet Psittacula alexandri was sighted, later on continuously seen in between the 16th to 25th February 2013 at sorghum research farm, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad. We report the first sighting of this species from state of Telangana.
  • Title
    A Revision of the Genus Parnara MOORE (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), with Special Reference to the Asian Species
    Type
    Report
    Description
    The genus Parnara MOORE is revised mainly on the basis of the male genitalia. A new species, P. kawazoei, is recognised from the Philippines and Sulawesi. P. apostata (SNELLEN), which was treated by EVANS (1949) as a subspecies of P. guttata (BREMER & GREY), is restored to species, and a new subspecies, debdasi, is described from Nepal. P. bada (MOORE), which was treated by EVANS as a subspecies of the Mascarene P. naso (FABRICIUS), is also restored to species and a new subspecies, borneana, is described from Borneo.
    Attribution
    http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110007707891/en
  • Title
    Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of the Kameng Protected Area Complex, western Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The butterflies of the Kameng Protected Area Complex in western Arunachal Pradesh, India, covering the protected areas of Eaglenest Wildlife Sanctuary, Pakke Tiger Reserve and Sessa Orchid Wildlife Sanctuary were surveyed over a 5-year period (2009–2014). A total of 421 butterfly species were recorded during the survey, including two species new to India (Gonepteryx amintha thibetana and Bhutanitis ludlowi) and several species rediscoveries and range extensions in the Eastern Himalaya, most notably Arhopala belphoebe, Sovia separata magna, Aulocera saraswati vishnu, Calinaga aborica, Callerebia annada annada, and Callerebria scanda opima. Here we provide an annotated checklist of butterflies of the Kameng Protected Area Complex, including historical records, distributions, abundance, habitats and other notes on these 421 species. An additional 42 species recorded in older literature or by other authors in recent times are also listed, taking the total number of species recorded in the landscape to 463.
    Attribution
    Sondhi, S. & K. Kunte (2016). Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of the Kameng Protected Area Complex, western Arunachal Pradesh, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(8): 9053–9124; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2984.8.8.9053-9124
  • Title
    Morphology and taxonomy of Oscillatoria princeps Vaucher ex gomont (OSCILLATORIALES, OSCILLATORIACEAE)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Background:Oscillatoria princepshas been reported from various parts of India for its diversity but not studied in detail about morphology and reproduction hence we try to fill that lacuna. Methods:Samples were collected from a stream near Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu. One part was preserved in 4% formalin, while the other part was brought to unialgal culture by streaking method. The cultures were grown and maintained in ASN III (-NaCl) medium at the photoperiodic culture racks with 8 hours light and 16 hours dark. Semi-permanent slides were prepared and Leica EC3 Microsystems was used for observation and documentation. Findings:The alga was dark blue green in colour, growing in clusters at the bottom of the stream. Individual filaments were blue green to olive green in colour. Mature trichome straight, cells much broader than long with distinct cross walls. Apical cells hemispherical with keritomized content. Individual cells were round in shape and the size varies from 57.60μm to 69.05μm in width and 5.20μm to 9.55μm in length thus the ratio of length and breadth as 1:8. When such cells were stacked one above the other it gives "stack of poker chips" appearance, characteristic feature of the species. Notches were found at the inner side of the cell corresponding to the slit on the trichome. When such cells were stacked one above the other, it results in the crack like appearance on the trichome. One to three notches/slits were observed in the present study. Reproduction both by fragmentation and hormogonia (formation of separation disc) was observed. Application/Improvements:The new finding like cracks/ slit like structure on trichome can be taken for further studies. The microphotographs will enable the researchers to have better understanding. Keywords Cyanobacteria,Oscillatoria princeps, Kanyakumari, BGA, Hormogonia and Necridia.
    Attribution
    V. Uma Rani, U. Elaya Perumal, S. Palanivel, Dept of Plant Biology and Plant Biotechnology, Guru Nanak College, Chennai 600042, India